CP0310 - Contemporary International Planning

SchoolCardiff School of Planning and Geography
Department CodeCPLAN0
Module CodeCP0310
External Subject CodeK400
Number of Credits20
LevelL6
Language of DeliveryEnglish
Module Leader Dr Richard Cowell
SemesterAutumn Semester
Academic Year2013/4

Outline Description of Module

This module invites students to reflect on their knowledge of the British planning system from an international and comparative perspective. It explains the international forces driving changes to planning cultures, such as economic and environmental globalisation, Europeanisation and cross-national policy learning, and considers how far the present and future forms of planning in different national settings reflects political, social and administrative cultures. Key components of planning law and practice (e.g. definitions of development, scope for discretion, role and status of plans, opportunities for participation, national-to-local relations) are analysed through a series of national case studies taken from Europe, North America and Asia. Students will apply their knowledge in a group-work exercise in teams of students act as consultants to design a new planning system for the European island of Pontevedro. The module is also helpful in prompting students to think about the scope for studying or working abroad.

On completion of the module a student should be able to

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered through a combination of lectures and workshops. There will be a two hour lecture every week, accompanied by Powerpoint slides that summarise key issues. These slides will form the basis of class handouts which, along with suggested additional reading, will be made available via Learning Central before each lecture commences. The first few lectures cover core theoretical issues; the majority consist of case studies of planning systems in different countries, each delivered by experts from within and beyond the School.

Six one-hour workshops also support the module. These cover skills (like presentation skills), explain what is required of the coursework, and test and discuss students’ understanding of (i) the core components of planning systems and (ii) key features of planning systems in other countries.

Skills that will be practised and developed

How the module will be assessed

The formal assessment of this module is in two components. A group presentation, in which teams of students – role-playing as consultancies – pitch ideas for the structure of a new planning system for the European island of Pontevedro. Marks are awarded for content and presentation skills, as well as performance in the role of a select committee, cross-examining another team about their proposals. Students get a shared group mark for this assessment.

The other piece of assessment is a written analysis of the scope for cross-national lesson drawing to improve Pontedro’s planning system.

Type of assessment

 

%

Contribution

Title

Duration
(if applicable)

Approx. date of Assessment

Groupwork presentation

50%

A proposed new planning system for Pontevedro

 

December

Written report

50%

Cross-national lesson drawing

 

January

The potential for reassessment in this module

Students are permitted to be reassessed in a module which they have failed, in line with the course regulations. The reassessment will usually take place during the summer.

Assessment Breakdown

Type % Title Duration(hrs) Period Week
Written Assessment 50
Contemporary International Planning Report - Cross-national Lesson Drawing
N/A 1 N/A
Presentation 50
Contemporary International Planning - A Proposed New Planning System For Pontevedro
N/A 1 N/A

Syllabus content

Syllabus content

This module invites students to reflect on their knowledge of the British planning system from an international and comparative perspective. It explains the international forces driving changes to planning cultures, such as economic and environmental globalisation, Europeanisation and cross-national policy learning, and considers how far the present and future forms of planning in different national settings reflects political, social and administrative cultures. Key components of planning law and practice (e.g. definitions of development, scope for discretion, role and status of plans, opportunities for participation, national-to-local relations) are analysed through a series of national case studies taken from Europe, North America and Asia. Students will apply their knowledge in a group-work exercise in teams of students act as consultants to design a new planning system for the European island of Pontevedro.

Essential Reading and Resource List

Indicative Reading and Resource List:

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